How to Get A Virtually Pain-Free Tattoo

I am going to share with you 7 step process  that will give you and your customers Virtually Pain-Free tattoo experience.

Are you Ready?

OK here we go!

Step 1

The first step in getting a tattoo is truly deciding if you really want one. Remember inking is usually permanent and you will have your tat for life! (Choose wisely!)I am going to share with you 7 step process  that will give you and your customers Virtually Pain-Free tattoo experience.

Are you Ready?

OK here we go!

Step 1

The first step in getting a tattoo is truly deciding if you really want one. Remember inking is usually permanent and you will have your tat for life! (Choose wisely!)

Step 2

Look at images and decided what you want tattooed and where. Some good old fashion  advice to those getting a first tattoo start with a small image.  You can always add onto it latter. Tattoo removal is very expensive, painful, and not always 100% effective. So use the motto: “Start small and build big.”

Step 3

Make an appointment with your regular health care provider (MD, NP, PA). They know your medical condition best and can advise you if they think that getting inked will negatively impact your health. (There really aren’t condition that fall under this category, but it is better to wise than foolish.)

Step 4

Request from accredited supplier for some “numbing cream” such as Dr. Numb (one I use and recommend). Be clear that your are asking for this medication because you are getting a tattoo. This will help the nurse or physician make a better clinical decision and provide you with the correct amount you may need and instructions on how to use it. (Please note: Most insurances will not cover this numbing medication so you need to take that into consideration. Cost vary but a general rule of thumb is about $50 to $75 per tube which may last for several “small” tats or just be enough for one “big” inking.

Step 5

The “numbing cream” consists of lidocaine (like the numbing medication you get at the dentist) and prilocaine (another type of numbing medication). Remember if you ever had an adverse reaction to these medications NEVER USE THEM FOR TATOOING or any other reason.

Step 6

Apply the numbing as directed by your health care provider. Generally, it is applied in a thick layer as opposed to a cream that is rubbed in and covered with clear plastic wrap with the edges taped around the wrap. This should be done at least one hour before your inking.

Step 7

Remove the dressing and wash away the numbing cream just prior to your inking session letting your tattoo artist know.

Tattoo Pain Chart

pain-ff

pain-fb

I hope that you find this information useful,

Have a great day,

Mike

P.S.Please comment below!

Step 2

Look at images and decided what you want tattooed and where. Some good old fashion  advice to those getting a first tattoo start with a small image.  You can always add onto it latter. Tattoo removal is very expensive, painful, and not always 100% effective. So use the motto: “Start small and build big.”

Step 3

Make an appointment with your regular health care provider (MD, NP, PA). They know your medical condition best and can advise you if they think that getting inked will negatively impact your health. (There really aren’t condition that fall under this category, but it is better to wise than foolish.)

Step 4

Request from accredited supplier for some “numbing cream” such as Dr.Numb (one I use and recommend). Be clear that your are asking for this medication because you are getting a tattoo. This will help the nurse or physician make a better clinical decision and provide you with the correct amount you may need and instructions on how to use it. (Please note: Most insurances will not cover this numbing medication so you need to take that into consideration. Cost vary but a general rule of thumb is about $50 to $75 per tube which may last for several “small” tats or just be enough for one “big” inking.

Step 5

The “numbing cream” consists of lidocaine (like the numbing medication you get at the dentist) and prilocaine (another type of numbing medication). Remember if you ever had an adverse reaction to these medications NEVER USE THEM FOR TATOOING or any other reason.

Step 6

Apply the numbing as directed by your health care provider. Generally, it is applied in a thick layer as opposed to a cream that is rubbed in and covered with clear plastic wrap with the edges taped around the wrap. This should be done at least one hour before your inking.

Step 7

Remove the dressing and wash away the numbing cream just prior to your inking session letting your tattoo artist know.

Tattoo Pain Chart

pain-ff

pain-fb

I hope that you find this information useful,

Have a great day,

Mike

P.S.Please comment below!

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124 thoughts on “How to Get A Virtually Pain-Free Tattoo”

  1. hi, thanks for the info. i knew about the numbing cream as i nhave used it. but the pain chart was fantastic. my boyfriend does my tatts and he tells me where it will hurt anr where it doesnt. but know i can look for myself and not have to ask him when im deciding what i want done and if it will work with my pain tolerance.(its low). so thanks again.

  2. Yes it is very good advise. One that still today dont follow. Just wonder How easy is it to cover a tattoo with another one?

    Thank

  3. Hey mike thanks I’ve been drawing tats for 25 years for people about a year ago I decided to try my hand at giving tats so my legs are covered with tattoos a lot of people ask if there is something to make it less painful thanks again for the advice every little bit of info. helps

  4. Hi mike thnx for the info, i actually used numbing cream when i got my belly pireced many yrs ago lol. never thought to use for a tat. Igot my first tat on my lower back, they had to line it up the my crack lol. then when they got to the dimples it tickled he kept telling me to stop laughing. now ai’m going for a fourth, my biggest tat so far. doesnt hurt that bad more like a bad rug burn ;)

  5. My first one was virtually pain free- the touch up on it stung though!
    My second one (left upper arm) took 3hrs for first session and 3hrs for the shading- still have to get color!
    My wrist which everyone insisted was REALLY painful was dead easy!

    I’ve found that the pain factor only kicks in after a period of about one hour then it becomes an annoying sting similar to sunburn being rubbed. I think it’s because it’s constant -not so much that it hurts.
    The length of time seems to dictate whether it ‘hurts’ or not.

  6. thanks mick i found it to be very helpfull as i am just starting tattooing and only done ten tattoos i am verry gratefull for any information you give me and always learn from you thanks onced more love the show i watch it all the time loved when you washed yoshies car good one

  7. hi thanks for the advice had my first one (right shoulder) before i went on here yeah it hurt a lot i didnt use the numbing cream tho getting another one this month going to use the numbing cream this time.lol thanks

  8. Mike
    Thanks, I have always used a bullet to bit-on. Na just kidding, I use to just go with it when I was in service, but know the doc gave me Oxy’s way too much. So now I just take the Oxy & have someone take me to get my tats.

  9. thanks it does help lots .This is going to be my 4th tattoo and the design I have is one designed by a friend, who is a tattooist but he recently moved to the US to open his second tattoo shop (1st shop in UK) .Can I email you the design?, as the picture that I have is on the body part I would prefer it to be but am bit unsure still of the pain level .thanks again nicky

  10. ive got plenty of tats but never used the cream before but im heading to some sore places quite soon. mite try it out and have a sleep when im being inked. Cheers mike. P

  11. thanks its very helpful i just done my first ankle tattoo last month so painful.
    once again thanks a lot 4 ur info.

  12. hi..thanks a lot for the info..it will really help me a lot..at least i have some ideas before getting my first ink..haha..

  13. Excellent advice my friend and this is coming from an E.R. R.N. I’m still looking for someone in the Phoenix area who does the “white” tats (only shows up under black light). Any suggestions?

  14. Well stated advise, you covered all the aspects of tattoo pain, especially for the newbie. Physical pain only lasts a short while, where emotional pain can last a lifetime. You make it so clear that I may put this up in my shop.

  15. I’ve got around 30 hours of work done on me so far, and just recently I had my sternum covered, and holy shit, I thought the ribs and collarbone were bad but the sternum was excruciating! Getting my neck done next month, this numbing cream might be something to check out haha

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